Conference

Thanks to everyone who made the 2nd annual PISA conference a complete success! Thanks to all the Sandy Tsuneyoshi, the presenters, officers, attendees and everyone at the University of Portland. This could not have happened without everyone’s help.

2nd Annual PISA Conference. It has concluded. Thank you very much to those who attended.

Location: University of Portland

5000 North Willamette Boulevard
Portland, OR 97203-5743
Google Map of the University of PortlandClick to enlarge.

Date: February 25th – 26th of 2011

Cost: FREE!

Meals include:
Saturday lunch
Saturday dinner

Hotel Informaton

Best Western Inn at the Meadows
Standard Price: $131-169 plus tax
UP Rates: $81.59 plus tax (king bed), $95.19 plus tax (2 queen beds)
Includes microwave, mini fridge, free parking, free wifi, and free continental breakfast

Days Inn – Delta Park
Standard Price: $90-111 plus tax
UP Rates: $63-$65
Includes free parking, free internet, free breakfast, and a FREE SHUTTLE TO DESTINATION

Agenda

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2011

ST. MARY’S LOUNGE

6:00 p.m.            Check In

7:00 p.m            Welcome to PISA Conference

8:00 p.m.            Jam Session

9:00 p.m.            Closing

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2011

ST. MARY’S LOUNGE

8:00 a.m.            Check In

9:00 a.m.            Welcoming

BUCKLEY CENTER

9:30 a.m.            Workshop I

10:45 a.m.            Workshop II

MEHLING BALLROOM

12:00 p.m.            Lunch

BUCKLEY CENTER

1:30 p.m.            Workshop III

2:45 p.m.            Toward Living Pono

4:15 p.m.            Keynote Speaker: Sandy Tsuneyoshi

ST. MARY’S LOUNGE

5:00 p.m.             Dinner

6:00 p.m.            Entertainment featuring Pound 4 Pound Entertainment

8:00 p.m.            Closing Remarks

Workshops:

Workshop Session I

  • Power of Participation: An Intro to Social Justice

There is much at stake for our communities this election and our collective participation is critical! Join Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO) for an interactive workshop about the struggles of API participation and the ways to build power in our communities.

  • From Chants to Rap | Exploring PI Music, Dance and Culture

This workshop critically explores music and dance in a social, historical and cultural lens. The goal of this workshop is to further appreciate the music, dance, art and culture of our ancestors and to share common experiences with other Islanders/cultures to better understand our shared histories of tradition, colonization and expression of cultural values.

  • Politics Through Hula

A historical education of hula in Hawai’i and how it was used for political movements and demonstrations as well.  Where does it come from?  What is it in hula that expresses steadfastness, leadership, and Hawaiian values?  A lecture (partially in the Hawaiian language), participatory discussion, and an immersion or lesson in hula…so come prepared to learn and move your bodies.

  • Cultural Conflict

Many of us have left the islands as young adults to attend school in the states. Others have been raised in the states by their parents who seek better opportunities for their selves and their children. In both cases, we have all experienced the struggle of being a Pacific Islander minority in the presence of white majority. For example, being stereotyped as uneducated, poor brown people that live in grass shacks. The many small comments and statements people have made to us over time have impacted our relationships with non-pacific islanders. What is it about these statements that affect our relationships with others? How can we address these stereotypes without creating conflict?  We will discuss these issues.

 

  • Warriors at What Cost: American Samoa and the US Military

What is the cost of economic progress in American Samoa and other Pacific territories and countries? What are the economic options available and how has history shaped these options? Presentation followed by open discussion.

Workshop Session II

  • Non-Profits

Leialoha is also the founder of ‘O.H.A.N.A. Foundation; a non-profit organization whose mission is to make a difference by promoting education.  Formed in 2009 with this mission in mind, ‘O.H.A.N.A. Foundation was able to hold their first annual hula exhibition, E ALA E, this past September with 450 in attendance.  E ALA E raised enough funds to award 4 scholarships to the class of 2011 who will be furthering their education in Oregon or Hawai’i.  ‘O.H.A.N.A. Foundation definitely began as a vision and this year they will be hosting not only Kulia I Ka Nu’u Scholarship Program, they will introduce Oregon to –  ‘O.H.A.N.A. Dance-athon which will raise funds for organizations in Oregon that work with at-risk or homeless teens, Ho’ola Kino – Live Right Youth Day Camp – teaching our youth about the challenges that our cultures are faced with as far as health and how to make that change and live right, 2nd Annual E ALA E in September and Adopt-a-Family this winter.  Leialoha has given us all belief that a difference can be made if we all come together and share in the same vision!

  • Say What!

“Say What” is a workshop brought by Mt. Hood Community College Students. It is basically about the clearing- up the stereotypes of Pacific Islanders. We would like to educate others that we, Pacific Islanders, are similar in many ways but there are also differences between us. You might think that we are ‘Like this’ but you are not sure! So come and see if you are right or wrong!

  • The Hawaiian Language and Its Depiction of Hawaiian Philosophy & Culture

An immersion and lesson in the Hawaiian language as well as an analyzation of Hawaiian philosophy and culture that comes from the Hawaiian language.  Please bring notebooks, an open-mind, and a motivation to learn something new and different.  Also, be ready to sing some songs to help practice Hawaiian language as well as analyzing the poetic language style that makes Hawaiian one of the most distinct languages in the world.

  • Pacific Islander Student Leadership

How many Asian/Pacific Islander identified people you know of that are strong leaders in the community? Society? How many API networks do you know of that are effectively supporting the API community? Networking and leadership are two of the most important components in building community, raising awareness, and making a change. It’s important to extend your network so that you can build community and friendship. Not only that, but you also develop leadership skills along the way. In this workshop we will cover the 3 main types of leaders: Dictatorship,  A Democratic leader, and a “Lazy” leader as well as some tips and tricks on effective networking. Come and make a change; become a leader; and make it happen!

  • Bi-Cultural Perspectives

A personal account and general discussion of the value of bi-cultural or multicultural perspectives in today’s world, in particular in education and professional environments.

Workshop Session III

  • Unnatural Causes

Unnatural Causes” is an acclaimed documentary series about the social barriers that keep our communities sick. This series provides a chance for our communities to come together and build a shared understanding of what causes poor health and how can we work towards better health outcomes.

  • The Stories on Our Skin

Pacific Islanders have been using tattoo art as an expression of culture and identity throughout the ages.  This workshop will explore different Pacific Islander tattoo traditions and how it connects to the modern surge of “getting inked.”

  • APA Art & Activism Library 2nd Floor

–       “In addition to being a catalyst for action, art may provide relief from the tyranny of the day-to-day” – Claire Peeps

In most successful movements for social change, artists are in the vanguard. In many cases it is their soundtrack, their visual sensibilities, their literature that comes to define a particular era in the popular imagination. Participants will leave with an understanding of what tools are at an artist’s disposal, case studies of ways artists have used them, and the roles artists can play in community activism and social justice advocacy.

  • Pacific Islander Student Leadership

How many Asian/Pacific Islander identified people you know of that are strong leaders in the community? Society? How many API networks do you know of that are effectively supporting the API community? Networking and leadership are two of the most important components in building community, raising awareness, and making a change. It’s important to extend your network so that you can build community and friendship. Not only that, but you also develop leadership skills along the way. In this workshop we will cover the 3 main types of leaders: Dictatorship,  A Democratic leader, and a “Lazy” leader as well as some tips and tricks on effective networking. Come and make a change; become a leader; and make it happen!

  • My Gender, My Role… Or Is It?

We’ll be exploring our definition of what it means to be a man, woman, or just a person in our household, and even in our individual countries.  How much of the Western Culture of gender roles really reflect our lives, and how is this inhibiting, or encouraging our role that we play within our families?  Be ready to share and be willing to talk about ways in which we all experience similarities and differences in our lives as we make decisions on who we want to be, and what we want to achieve.

Food will be provided by the University of Portland’s catering.

—————————————————————————————————————————–


Preview of Last Year’s Conference

PISA First Annual Conference “Small Islands, Big World”

Date: January 15 & 16, 2010

Location: Portland Community College Sylvania


Workshop Session I (9:00am–10:45am):

Makerusa Porotesano—Pacific Islands 101

Siniva Bennett— Our Pacific, Colonial Contact and Military Impact

Dr. Moli—Family Structure in Relation to Religion

John Saito— Healthcare Disparities in Pacific Islanders and Career Possibilities

Western State Center—Gender/Women Issues

Workshop Session II (11:00am–12:30pm):

John Saito—Who are you? Who am I?

Samuel Manuel—PIs and the Law

Akala Neves—I O Ai Ka Inoa O Na Kupuna E

Anselmo Villanueva—TBA

Dr. Toeutu—Samoan Tatau

Workshop Session III (2:00pm–3:30pm):

Makerusa Porotesano & Harvey Fuapau—Creating a PISA-like Student Group: The New look for Pacific Islander Student Groups

Dr. Toeutu—Samoan Chief Systems

Akala Neves—Hula and Contemporary Hawaiian Culture

Kanani Martinez—Oregon University System

Fipe and Ria—Living two lives

Workshop Session IV (3:40pm–5:10pm):

Kanani Martinez—Student Panel

Census 2010—Pacific Islanders Count

Colin Kiley—Music and Cultural Significance (if time allows, bring island music to share)

Living Pono–1hr documentary featuring internationally acclaimed film and stage actor Jason Scott Lee, and his effort to live more sustainably off the grid at his taro farm on the Big Island of Hawaii.

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15 responses

27 10 2009
Ria

Yay for registration!!!

1 12 2009
Bennett

great……………………………………………………..
.. … . … . .. . .. . .. …

27 01 2011
Mearl Capelle

Where can we get the registration form from?

5 02 2011
nwpisa

I just put up the registration form. You can register here. Thanks!

4 12 2009
Zoe

I’m the advisor for the Pacific Islander Club at McKay High School, where we’ve had a very active group of Micronesian students for the last nine years. Are you interested in connecting with high school groups or only colleges?

Where can I get more info on the conference? Can my students and/or I attend?
Is there another place where more up-to-date info is being put instead of this (or is it just that perennial problem with all of us being volunteers and being overwhelmed)?
I’m so glad to learn of your existence here in Oregon!

8 12 2009
nwpisa

Hey Zoe, I sent a reply to your yahoo email. go ahead and check it when you have the chance. Great to hear from you!
Colin – PISA – PR Officer

7 01 2010
HAVEA FUAPAU

whats up uce… i’m looking fwrd to this conference.. i never thought i would see this day so soon… for everyone who has not signed up yet.. need i remind you..this is the first conference ever here in oregon… so don’t be like others and be late, be like us and participate…

malo ‘aupito,
Fatboy harvey

7 02 2011
doris tulifau

hey am i registered lol

10 02 2011
nwpisa

Hi Doris,
No I don’t see your name on the registry.

10 02 2011
iNOPASz

Hey what’s really good? well I’m kind of new. My name is Ilona Ilon and I am Micronesian. I’ve heard about this and would like to try out, not only me thought but my classmates also. We go to “FIR HOOD HIGH” CHYEA !! eheheh. and we can’t wait to see what’s good there. aite see ya’ll !!

10 02 2011
nwpisa

Hi Ilona! Welcome to PISA! I’m glad your interested. If you have any questions, feel free to email me at samanthamatsuda@gmail.com. I hope you can make it to Conference!

10 02 2011
Chasmon Tarimel

Hey! This looks great and I can’t wait for it to happen! Are you still accepting people who want to put up a workshop? i have a great person in mind so if you are, let me know! thank you!

12 02 2011
nwpisa

Hi there, Chamson! PISA appreciates your enthusiasm! We have our workshops for this year finalized, but it’s never too early to start thinking ahead! If you have an idea you’d like to share, be sure to email us at pisanw@gmail.com! 🙂 Thanks for registering & spread the word about PISA! We’ll see you at the conference! 🙂

18 02 2011
Jay Aldan

I look forward to attending this event! It will be my first time ever!

18 02 2011
nwpisa

Hi Jay! Well PISA looks forward to seeing you. We appreciate your enthusiasm in attending the conference! See you soon.

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